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20121101
20121130
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us and it gives us more government that's inefficient and doesn't work very well. it gives us the possibility of even higher taxes. and there's a lot of reasons i hate higher taxes, the biggest reason is i know where that money goes in that city and it's time to clean it up down there. the last thing we need is higher taxes and regulators. instead of embracing the people that give people opportunity for jobs, they pound on us, they pound on small business people and stunt our growth. but we have another choice here tonight. and that's why there is so many people here tonight. you know it's about that american dream. you know government is not the answer. government is the last resort and not a first resort. and we know we're stronger when we run america from the bottom up. when people have more money in their pocket. when families have more wealth and people get jobs. and the greatest issue in america today is jobs. and the reason is mom and dad are working, the family is stronger t children are stronger. it all works for a stronger america and stronger communities. that is wh
you do instead of dealing with the policy issues. we have have a very distinguished member with us, a good friend of all of us, someone who deals seriously with policy issues and is joined us today and that would be january from illinois. >> also i think today of most significance i believe is my role on the intelligence committee. all of us were given a briefing based on emerging information from the intelligence committee . susan rice, i do -- susan rice went on television based on the information that was available at the time and the briefing that she was given information and intelligence that she had no part in collecting. the kind of statement that is anyone who had been given those briefings would have made in public. obviously, this was on an unclassified buys sis but she was given information that she had that has subsequently been updated. it was not wrong or deliberately misleading in any way. there had been the belief that there had been a protest that developed into this attack. so susan rice as the president very clearly said, if anyone has a problem with the intelli
>> tonight, anthony kennedy talks about preserving the u.s. constitution followed by the history of the presidential appointment process. anthony kennedy talks about protecting and preserving the u.s. constitution. from the heritage foundation, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and gentlemen. it is great for me to be able to join john in welcoming new year to this lecture. this is the fifth annual occasion on which we have had this lecture. the heritage foundation vision is to build an america where freedom, opportunity, prosperity, and civil society flourished. to help achieve this vision, the center launched the preserve the constitution series, which is an annual lecture series to inform and -- inform citizens on topics related to this constitution. the series promotes the protection of individual liberties, property rights, free enterprise, constitutional limits on government. we've been able to feature some of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight'
that question -- the roles of our committee are you cannot use something that you learned in a classified session. i can give you my assessment based on questions, my investigation, that what susan rice did was use talking points, pulled out originally by the cia signed off by the intelligence community, those were requested by the house committee. the intelligence committee sign off of it. the key was there were unclassified talking points at an early stage. i do not think she should be pelerine for this. she did what i would have done or anybody else would have done that was going on a weekend show. you would have said what talking points can i use? you get an unclassified version. i just remember -- i just read it to the committee what i was going to tell you and questions asked. to be sure it did not violate our rules. this particularly is for people in public office because you are used to answering questions candidly to have to be restricted to what is unclassified. is very difficult for your >> did he talk about his resignation? >> [indiscernible] >> i think it is making a very div
the most fortunate among us to pay a little extra to reduce the debt. also, the only bill with a chance of being signed into law by president obama. speaker boehner once again urges us to pass the house bill, extending tax breaks for millionaires and billionaires. the senate has already consider that bill and we rejected it on a bipartisan basis. for the speaker to say, bring it up, we are behalf. it was loaded down in this congress. -- it was voted down in this congress. the president has spoken. he will not sign until the mortgages our future to pay for handouts. i hope house republicans have been listening. i also hope my colleagues, republicans and democrats, members of the house and senate, use the thanksgiving break not only to give things, but reflect on the monumental path ahead. i hope they took time to reflect on the effort needed to complete these tasks. as white howard said, there will have to be compromises. seeking the middle of the road is not just acceptable, it is the only way forward. >> as a modem -- as most americans know by now, the next few weeks are critically imp
been fit. -- ben fifment -- benefit. 320 million of us have to come together, mr. speaker. on tough, tough challenges. challenges that this house has crafted solutions to. these solutions are not easy. these solutions are not pain free. these solutions involve shared commitment from every single american. because as freedom is eroding in this country, every single american suffers. and economic opportunity and economic liberty is expanded in this country, absolutely every american benefits. we can do better, mr. speaker. as a nation we have done better, as the united states house of representatives. and i come here today just to remind my president, the white house, that the election is over. the time for clever sound bites that register on the public opinion polls is far behind us. in front of us are hard, hard decisions that this house has led on and that we are waiting patiently for partnership to work on and to pass. i want to leave you three numbers, mr. speaker. h.r. 5652, h.r. 5652, it's the -- it was passed in may called the sequester replacement reconciliation act. it was t
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
find -- i am an eternal. i used to be a reporter. it is a combination of writing and editing from my vantage point. >> did you both deal with the editor and publisher? >> yes. >> thanks a lot. that is three interesting. >> one of my favorite parts of the book is petraeus is the dominant character and we have great access to him and it is told from his point of view but we established a group of secondary characters. three of them were the tenet commanders who were commanding combat battalions so we tell the story of their war. one fodder on kandahar, one in the mountains of eastern afghanistan, and gazni province and they all intersected with petraeus. the fourth secondary character is here, doug oliphant. we have one of the lieutenant colonels here. the general's aid in bosnia? he was his aide during the invasion of iraq. harry was back in afghanistan -- and here he was back in afghanistan. it was the first time -- petraeus has a special relationship with the 101st because he commanded them in the invasion of iraq. it was his first combat command. it so happened that the 101st was i
. so brian's been helping us out with that along with loretta and the american ireland fund. thanks of course especially to president joya who has made me feel so welcome here and to dean of the mcdonough school of business and to j.t. right there who is learning the cords of sunday, bloody sunday instead of doing his homework. that's president's son. [applause] >> all right, j.t. and amu menam. you know, look at that. this is going to -- this is the spirit. and that is going to change the world. you have it in here in this room. you can feel it. and what a room it is, by the way. wow. i mean youtube has play -- i mean u 2 has played some nice halls. i don't know if this is a lectern or a pulpit, but i feel oddly comfortable. it's a bit of a worry, isn't it? so welcome to pop culture studies. 101, please take out your notebooks. today we're going to discuss why rock stars should never ever be given microphones at institutions of higher learning. you will receive no credits for taking this class. i'll even -- not even street credits. it's too late for that. i will be dropping in odds
and the press. if i use the word twilight to suggest that network news, as we have known it, is on its way out and as something new is emerging. whether what is new will satisfy the urgent needs of our democracy cannot be noted at this time. let's hope that it will. without a free and occasionally rambunctious media, we will not be living in an open society. the free press and an open society are intimately linked, one dependent on the other. network news -- if network news is in its twilight, then perhaps our democracy is facing a turning point as well. i asked an old colleague and a friend, ted koppel, to discuss the changes in network news and what those changes might mean for our society. ted is known best for his 25 years of anchor and host of nightline, but he has also been a foreign correspondent, a war correspondent, and author, and he has covered many political campaigns. i shared something in preparing with this -- for this program. i ran into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more th
, broadcast news has been outflanked and overtaken by scores of other media options. help us understand the perceived need for these changes because they not only affect the quality of network news, by the way, do you agree with me that it is in the twilight zone a? >> it is in a twilight. but remember, twilight is usually followed by night and then don follows night. i am still hopeful. you know, it is not going to stay this way forever. i think, you know, what tends to happen in this country as you and i have observed over the last 50 or 60 years, we tend to go too far to the right, and then we correct course and passed through the middle and go too far to the left, and then we correct course again i think what is happening to broadcast journalism requires a course correction. as we come to realize that our educational system is not as good as we like to believe, that our health care system is not as good as we like to believe, that we are spending -- i mean, there are so many things that are on the brink of taking us into real disaster. not the least of them being the possibility of
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof through the ni
us. it will leave it there. and that is our show today on the "washington journal", and we will see you right back here tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. "washington journal >> here's a look at some of our lives programming. they're talking about the gun without cancer program. he concedes that live at 1:00 p.m. eastern. this will be like that three caught 30 p.m. eastern. later this afternoon we are back here for a speech by u2 lead singer bono. coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year began to sell off our debts and entitlement reform. it to be in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise and to ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenges. i refuse to accept any approach that is not a balance. i'm not going to ask students and seniors to pay down the entire deficit with people like me making over $280,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the current congress still has work to do through the end of the year. work is e
. the american people would like to see us resolve. let me conclude by saying, energy. the quickest way, one of the most elementary ways of putting people back to work on the at a hurry, and having a tremendous impact for us to do something to pass what we commonly call [indiscernible] which will immediately create jobs. it is being held up by political sin and against these communities can be looked at. i would like to yield now. i am assuming i am yielding to the chair of our policy. >> thank you very much. >> we cannot afford to have any more distractions. we have to do everything we can to create growth whil. it is time for the public majority to break this streak and start put real jobs legislation on the schedule. the president a few moments ago spoke and he talked about what ever we are doing, that we need to have a peak that is about running our economy. unless we can grow our economy, we are not coming to be able to put people back to work, a deal with our deficit, and we will not have economic security for the future. in order to create jobs and fiske our economy, we have to invest
together, and find common ground. make the compromises and find some consensus. i think all of us agree. we need to be focus on them and not on politics in washington. my hope is that this will be the beginning of a free fall process -- fruitful process and we are able to balance our deficit in a balanced way. we will be focusing to make sure that middle class families are able to get ahead. i want to thank all of the leaders for coming. with that, we will get to work. thank you. there is one other point i want to make. tomorrow is house speaker boehner's birthday. for those of you who want to wish him a happy birthday, we are not going to get him a cake because we did not know how many candles we would need. [laughter] >> thank you. >> thank you. >> following the meeting, house and leaders spoke briefly to reporters. >> good morning, everyone. we just had a meeting with the president to talk about america posted fiscal problems. i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. i believe the framework that i have outlined in our meeting today is cons
. this is the last, number three, and ate plice to all of us here tonight. after this last debate i asked myself one simple question and i'll ask you that question tonight. who do we trust as parents and grandparents to protect our sons and daughters when their sent to foreign lands to protect our country? my answer, mitt romney. [applause] and this is my final message to our president currently, barack obama if you're a country music fan you may recognize the lyrics. you don't have to go home, but you can't stay here. [applause] so please welcome our next speaker, the governor of the great state of ohio. [applause] >> do you like what's going on in ohio? we're growing jobs and helping families. well let me tell you what we're doing in mow hoe is what mitt romney is going to do in jashjash and get this country back on track again. [applause] it's really faith ladies and gentlemen and boys and girls, and by the way i've never seen so many young people at campaign rallies. and i'll tell you what i think it's all about. we as americans recognize we have two pathes to choose. we've seen what the last fo
and the whole wide world. the family loaned it to us. then jack carter and his wife wanted to keep the bed because they realized how beautiful it was. the family in missouri said, no, we all republicans and we are taking it back. [laughter] there are all kinds of things that go on that you will never hear about these stories. >> that is a perfect segue. we are going sequentially. escaped from the white house. you both have very good stories. this has to be high on the list of any teen fantasy. lynda, what is your story? >> this is a problem because you read too much, my mother would say. i read a story about the wilson girls. i read in a book that they wanted to know what people really thought about them. i did not want to know what people really thought about me. they described how they put on some different clothes and went down onto the first floor and walked through the house. you have to understand, in our day, anybody who wanted to go see the white house could just get in line in the morning. not mondays because they claimed on monday's. tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday, and satu
. that is how i will conduct myself as president. i will bring us together. [cheers and applause] you know, i learned as governor achievements. usually returned in kind. i will not just represent one party. i represent one nation. [cheers and applause] every argument that he could think of, president obama has tried to convince you that these last four years have been a success. and so, his plan for the next four years is to take all of the ideas of the first four, and you is, the borrowing, obamacare, and just do them all over again. one party. i represent one nation. [cheers and applause] obamacare, and just do them all over again. he calls his plan forward, and i call it forewarned. [cheers and applause] that same path meansand i under0 trillion in debt at the end of four years. it means crippling unemployment continues. pay, depressed real estate values, and a depressed military. last week, president obama asked revenge. people to vote for love of country. [cheers and applause] america to a better place. we are one day away from a fresh start and one day away from a new beginning. my conv
. there are a lot of us you think we're in a different place in our history, in this economy, and we have to take much more seriously the allocation of our resources and the impact of that tax code on investment and consumption in this country if we are going to have a piper the economy. that argument -- a vibrant economy. that would lead you to begin to this is much more serious about tax reform. let me add just to make the thing harbor, i think chris carter, dick is right, you will not just rate reductions as a way to pay for it. what you might look for is another stream of income, and one theory that is under discussion in some circles, we get a lot of analysis, the carbon tax, which does not have a prayer in hell kind of proposition. if we enabled factions in the congress to get other things they want as important, it might be that he could start something modestly that grows over time and in a sense kill two birds with constant. somebody might get killed in the process. >> that is right. what you look for is the least worst alternative, and that is something like that that may provide that.
, they are not harming us. it is really hard to argue that we need to be locked into something when there is no evidence that the budget projections of the future are harming us right now. in the 1990's, there was a market signal an interest rates started to go up. people believed the deficit was given to the economy. we do not know if that is going to kick in, but there is no reason to fight against this hypothetical increase when we have these problems now. >> the only advantage we have is that we are in a better situation today than greece and southern europe. >> is that a fair comparison given the size of our economy and our growth rate? >> chris is a different situation. spain -- greece is a different situation. spain, france, italy -- they all know they have a problem. they thought they could go on borrowing. he cannot count on the forever and we cannot count on this forever. >> the deficit will look better next year as the economy starts to improve and we are freezing out about a debt problem that does not really exists. >> any sensible projection of the next decade since the death -- debt to gdp
mellow. we will make that work for us. today's panel is on the question of for-profit and federal education policy. this is a topic that we at aei have been talking about for an extended stretch. in support of the templeton foundation, we have been running the private enterprise projects, trying to think about the opportunities and the challenge. how do make this work for kids in the community's? how do we think about some of the challenges the potential perils? this panel is a close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number of pieces that will be coming up as a book this spring. we have the opportunity to work. phones, inose of the was cell turn them off. why this topic? the vast majority of what we do in america k-12 is done by public institutions. it is done by institutions run by states. and a lot of other work including most charter schools are run by nonprofit. then there is a substantial slot of activity that is for profit. they run schools or colleges. they sell everything from pencils to paper to textbooks to curricula to school systems. we do
.8%, the unemployment rate, from september. showing 171,000 jobs added in october, this according to the u.s. bureau of labor statistics this morning. i want to get your quick reaction to those numbers. guest: first of all, that is virtually no change. yes, it is an uptick, and it was down the month before. but unemployment is staying basically around 8%. if you count the people of -- who have given up looking for jobs in this country, we have over 20 million people who are unemployed right now. we have to address their needs and concerns, and make sure they have jobs over the next four years. by producing 12 million jobs, a lot of these people will be put back to work. if we continue the policies of the last four years, i am afraid we will see the next norm for unemployment in this country will be 8%, and the unemployment figures are going to stay around that 20 million figure. i think we can do a lot better. i think governor romney certainly has a program to do that, he and certainly in ohio we have proven that it can be done. host: let us go to judith, on the democratic line. you are on. caller:
colleague have the last word. there are a few person -- there are a few people that started with us. i do not know if you want to raise your hands. we are grateful you can stay with us that long. >> thank you. elizabeth sinclair. with respect to dick morris and karl rove do not need my defenses. i know it is easy to make fun of people when they have lost, but they have distinguished themselves in other ways and work hard for the campaign. as somebody who thought mitt romney would win big time and am now taking a lot of flak from all of my liberal friends and family, i would like, imichael whether he could share some of his reasoning why he thought this brilliant man thought mitt romney would win handily. >> could the panel comment on what effect this will have on the supreme court appointments that will come up in the next four years? >> the economy might be recovering. if the recovery is not complete or if growth is tepid and slow and jobs do not come back by the time of the next presidential campaign, how will that affect the types of policies that candidates will propose? different sol
you for joining us. that is all for "washington journal" today. we will see u.s. 7:00 a.m. eastern tomorrow. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> president obama and republican mitt romney will be focused on ohio today, one day before election day. it will both be in columbus. president obama will start the day keeping me in madison, wisconsin. -- it will both be in columbus. mr. romney has four campaign stops today. manchester, new hampshire tonight. we are pleased to cover his million shares bought. c-span asked reporters and political analyst what they're watching for on election night, both on the national and state level. here is what they had to say. >> you always watched the first votes that, in. it varies from year to year. i have done this for decades and i care to remind you of. they come in different places. you have to know the history, county, to interpret the results. once we get a sizable lover of boats and, i will look at the critical counties in north virginia. i will look up to chesterf
is more republican than it used to be. that's why before the election republicans were saying mitt romney was winning the independents he's going to win, that wasn't the case because the independents are already a republican group. host: from the 2008 elections when obama won 52% to john mcwane's 44% of those who identified themselves as independents. these candidates were trying to reach those independents out there but you're saying not all the independents are truly independents? guest: when people identify as independent they mean a lot of different things. some people mean i go back and forth, that's one group. other people mean i kstly vote for one party or the other but i don't think of myself as a member of that party. and so you really have to distinguish between how people identify themselves which is one thing and how people vote which is not necessarily the same thing. host: a couple of calls for you on the democratic line. caller: good morning. i just want to comment on the latino vote. i know you had a guest before and we could relate on. this a couple of points basically. h
best do that in the u.s. senate right now? i thought about that with my wife and children, and they have been such wonderful supporters, and i realize there is a gridlock. we cannot allow it to continue. we cannot have the nation we want if senate and congress is gridlock. i decided my experience as a tough times mayor and governor were an experience i could bring to the table to make good things happened in partnership with others. that was 19 months ago. we have trouble more than 60,000 miles. we have recruited more than 50,000 donors, including a deer i hit and killed, so we gave up a windshield process required and in the process. this campaign has taught me now more than ever we need people who know how to be partners rather than just partisans. we are americans but virginians furs. i learn this when i was the mayor. we knew who the democrats and republicans were. we were bipartisan. as a mayor, we were able to build schools common on -- to build schools, to cut crime, to clean up the river, and we did it by working together. as governor, you get a four-year term. min
the executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles. he was the first chief of the u.s. office of citizenship, appointed by president george w. bush. alfonso is responsible for developing initiatives and programs to educate immigrants about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and encourage their integration into american civic culture. brad bailey is the founder and ceo of texas immigration solutions. to 2011, he was the order of houston-area -- owner of houst on-area restaurants. his group seeks to develop conservative solutions to immigration policy but he served on the 2012 platform committee of the republican party of texas. richard land is the president of the southern baptist convention's official added to address social, moral, and ethical concerns, with a particular attention to impact on american families and their faith. he is also the editor of a national magazine dedicated to coverage of traditional religious values, christian ethics, and cultural trends. last but not least, my friend ramesh ponnuru, senior editor for "national review" magazine an
the united states has -- enforces policies on other countries. if the states and the u.s. were to go to legalization, are we going to get ourselves but the trouble with any international organization or treaties we have signed? >> i did not know much about the treaty arrangement that the regulation drug distribution but i did read an interesting article that said the greatest loser when it came to the legalization of marijuana in the state's where the drug growers in mexico. that is not a treaty arrangement but obviously an economic arrangement that may have some political ramifications beyond just drugs. >> the prohibition counterpart to that, i enormous amount of liquor came in from the u.k. directly to the bahamas. nasa was a town of 700 people before prohibition -- nassau was a town of 700 people before prohibition di. the colonial secretary of the u.k. at that time was winston churchill. we can imagine what he thought about prohibition. he called that a front to the entire history of mankind. . >> if you could talk a little bit about the importance of studying constitutional his
dollars. in energy, health care, questions, we routinely use federal dollars. no one really thinks about whether it is an issue or not. that is partially something about a notion of innocent children and partially because we have not had these big efforts to step up to trade these outcome of checks that will work. >> that is dead on. i still remember him being in a meeting very early in the chart your movements. -- charter movement. there was an association to promote choice. there was an argument that broke out about whether quality should be in the mission statement. quality would be the way that those who oppose choice would come down and shut it down. literally. this was a heated hour-long conversation. if you think about that, how you could argue at any time that quality should not always be associated with option, you're always going to lose the argument. why have it? that said, we are about to watch it happen again. this movie plays over and over again. the sector has the opportunity to move ahead and set a benchmark for how you define performance and avoid a backlash. virtual sc
any further. >> let's go to this part of the room. let's go here. >> u.s. news and world report. it seems the coalition was unable biunique elements of this election. he have the bain background. how will they try to recreate the coalition? >> great question. a year ago, i would have said -- he ran poorly among blue collar and older whites. even with paul ryan on the ticket, a 60% of seniors voted for romney. in the long run, i think those red states are problematic for democrats. look at north carolina. in north carolina or virginia, obama's numbers among blue- collar whites are unbelievably low. they are in the high-20's or 30's. in the long run, i do think there is this pattern. the sun belt will be more important than the west about. they do have the incredible ability to hang on to -- the shift will be to states that have the same social forces of rising diversity and rising education levels. >> we have a slight disagreement. obama did well among these groups in 2008. democrats do well among white blue-collar voters in the midwest. there are union presidents and other thing
much. everybody, please have a seat. thank you. good afternoon, everybody. now that those of us on the campaign trail have had a chance to get a little sleep, it is time to get back to work, and there's plenty of work to do. as i said on tuesday night, the american people voted for action, not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. in that spirit, i have invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. i also intend to bring in business and labor and civic leaders from all across the country to get their ideas as well. in a time when our economy is still recovering from the great recession, our top priority has to be jobs and growth. that is the focus of the plan that i talked about during the campaign. [applause] it is a plan to reward small businesses and manufacturers to create jobs here, not overseas, a plan to give people the chance to get the education and training that businesses are looking for right now. it is a plan to make sure this country
? in an earlier exchange of the phrase was used -- if republicans are talking about tax increases -- actually, republicans are talking about tax increases. calling it revenue increases as part of the deal. plenty of republican members of congress are scrambling are looking for ways to tinker with things are then marginal tax rates. i will name three specific members who have talked about it or something very much to like it, all who signed the pledge. bob corker, tom coburn, and john mccain. what is going on? it certainly looks to a layman that there is a desperate scramble to find a way to raise revenue in a cbo-scoring way that would not be seen as violating the pledge. the question is, is the pledge of losing its magic? >> i take very strong exception to taking this poll seriously. because if you ask people, the vast majority of whom are not going to be subjected to this tax, and they are being told that somebody else will have to pay. and if you discover in the process that only 60% of the voters are in favor of that, i think it speaks for itself and speaks very well of the american peopl
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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